Bandwidth-wise, images are hogs. They are the largest average web site payload (62%), and they are most often the content bottleneck. When images arrive, they come tripping onto the page, pushing other elements around and triggering a clumsy repaint. They come “chop chop chop chop chop down” or you get nothing until suddenly “boom!” out of nowhere there it is. We all know what I’m talking about when I say “chop chop down” and “boom” and it makes us a little bit sick, because we sense how much time we’ve lost of our precious, short lives, waiting for pictures to download.

A missed opportunity

Photos are the main culprit when it comes to slow rendering. They are the most common type of image requested and on average weigh more. They are millions of colors and pixel depth is increasing. They are beautiful, and we don’t want to compromise on quality.

Web-optimized photos are jpegs, and jpegs come in two flavors: baseline and progressive. A baseline jpeg is a full-resolution top-to-bottom scan of the image, and a progressive jpeg is a series of scans of increasing quality. And that’s how they render; baseline jpegs paint top to bottom (“chop chop chop…”), and progressive jpegs quickly stake out their territory and refine (or at least that’s the idea).

Progressive jpegs are better because they are faster. Appearing faster is being faster, and perceived speed is more important that actual speed. Even if we are being greedy about what we are trying to deliver, progressive jpegs give us as much as possible as soon as possible. They assist us in our challenge of delivering big beautiful photos today.

Experimenting locally with a throttled bandwidth, an 80K progressive jpeg beats a 5K baseline jpeg (the same image, downsized) to the page in Firefox on Windows. This should blow your mind. Sure, the progressive jpeg’s first pass is low-resolution, but it contains as much information, or more, as the small image. And if you are zoomed out, perhaps on a mobile device, you will not notice it’s low-res. That’s responsive images working for us right now!

Progressive jpeg example

Basically, progressive jpegs are better. So what’s the most common type of jpeg online? You guessed it: baseline, and by a very wide margin. In a thousand-image sample, 92.6% are baseline.

No worries, we just need to declare progressive jpegs a best practice and get the rest of the world on-board with us. But in order to declare progressive jpeg a best practice, we need to be confident that it is. And to do so we need to first understand what browser support for this type of jpeg looks like today.

Reality Check #1

Progressive jpegs are displayed in all browsers, that’s not a worry. Our concern is how they render.

Behavior of progressive jpegs across browsers

Browser (specific version tested) Foreground progressive jpeg renders Background progressive jpeg renders
Chrome (v 25.0.1323.1 dev Mac, 23.0.1271.97 m Win) progressively (superfast!) progressively (superfast!)
Firefox (v 15.0.1 Mac, 12.0 Win) progressively (superfast!) instantly after file download (slow)
Internet Explorer 8 instantly after file download (slow) instantly after file download (slow)
Internet Explorer 9 progressively (superfast!) instantly after file download (slow)
Safari (v 6.0 Desktop, v 6.0 Mobile) instantly after file download (slow) instantly after file download (slow)
Opera (v 11.60) instantly after file download (slow) instantly after file download (slow)

These are disappointing results, but overall, market share and progressive rendering for progressive jpegs are trending upward. Support is currently at about 65% (Chrome + Firefox + IE9).

Unfortunately, the browsers that do not render progressive jpegs progressively render them all at once after download is complete, which makes them less progressive and slower than baseline jpegs. While baseline rendering is not as immediate and smooth as progressive rendering, at least it’s something while we wait, and the “chop chop” is a kind of progress indicator (a good thing). We can’t underestimate the reassurance we give users when they see something is happening.

By choosing progressive jpegs we are giving a majority of users an excellent experience and a minority — but a significant minority — a worse experience. But if we select baseline jpegs because it is a less poor experience in a minority of views, that’s a terrible compromise. We need to offer the best experience to our users, and look ahead.

Reality Check #2

You might ask “Aren’t progressive jpegs bigger than regular jpegs? Don’t we pay for the ‘layers’?” This is true for other types of interlaced images, but not jpegs. A progressive jpeg is usually a few kilobytes smaller than its baseline version. Plotting the savings of 10000 random baseline jpegs converted to progressive, Stoyan Stefanov discovered a valuable rule of thumb: files that are over 10K will generally be smaller using the progressive option.

It would be an easier sell if we could say progressive jpegs are always smaller, so always make progressive jpegs. Stoyan helps us out here. He says “One observation about the 10K rule is that when baseline is smaller, it’s smaller by a small margin. When progressive is smaller it’s usually a lot smaller. So it’s ok to say go 100% progressive and you’ll do better.”

That’s exactly what I wanted to hear! For all the baseline jpegs we’ve been serving, we’ve been missing opportunities in file size and perceived speed. Choosing the progressive option is win-win, and should always be the default. Then, after all jpegs are progressive, if we want to optimize further, it’s just a few bytes we’ll save and only on our smallest images.

The reason baseline jpegs are most common online, no doubt, is because image-optimization tools make them by default. However, all of the ones I looked at — Photoshop, Fireworks, ImageMagick, jpegtran — have a progressive option. Therefore, to serve progressive jpegs you’ll need to consciously modify your image optimization process.

I’d expect Smushit to translate baseline jpegs to progressive, and sure enough it does. (Smushit, btw, can be run from the command line and integrated into your image optimization process.)

How do you know if your jpegs are progressive? Here are a few ways to identify jpeg type:

  1. ImageMagick — On the command line run: identify -verbose mystery.jpg | grep Interlace The output will either be “Interlace: JPEG” or “Interlace: None.”
  2. Photoshop — Open file. Select File -> Save for Web & Devices. If it’s a progressive jpeg, the Progressive checkbox will be selected.
  3. Any browser — Baselines jpegs will load top to bottom, and progressive jpegs will do something else. If the file loads too fast you may need to add bandwidth throttling. I use ipfw on my Mac.

Reality Check #3

According to this progressive jpeg FAQ, each progressive scan requires about the same amount of CPU as the entire baseline jpeg would take to render. This is not a concern for desktops but possibly for mobile devices.

The extra computation is a disadvantage but not a deal breaker. Delivering photos on small hardware is a challenge regardless. I know this because I’m writing a photo gallery application with infinite scrolling and it crashes on iPad. If you are handling a lot of images, you will have challenges on mobile anyway — different challenges.

As we’ve seen in the chart, Mobile Safari does not render progressive jpegs progressively anyway, and probably because they tax the CPU. But this is not a new image file format. Therefore, it wasn’t an option for browsers, even mobile browsers, to choose not to support progressive jpegs. Hopefully soon mobile browsers will leverage progressive rendering, but it makes sense why they currently don’t. It’s also a crying shame; we could really use the speed and file size savings progressive jpegs give us for mobile. When I said they are a kind of solution for responsive images right now, well, they would be, but aren’t yet.

Onward

In the last few days, Google got on-board with their Mod_Pagespeed service, making convert_jpeg_to_progressive a core filter. SPDY does as well, translating jpegs that are over 10K to progressive by default, following Stoyan’s rule of thumb. This will make browsers that support incremental display seem much faster. As you can see in the chart above that includes Google Chrome, so it makes sense that Google would make this choice. I’m not going to say that because “do-no-evil-make-the-web-faster” Google has selected progressive jpeg to be a best practice so should we. But it’s more data and validation. Most importantly, it shows that progressive jpeg — a format that has been in a kind of deep freeze for a decade — has staged a comeback.

And even though not all current browsers make use of progressive jpeg’s progressive rendering, the ones that do really benefit, and we get file size savings across the board. It’s our best option today and we should use it. Progressive jpegs are the future, not the past.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ann Robson photo

Ann Robson (@arobson) is a front-end web engineer at Webshots.

183 Responses to “Progressive jpegs: a new best practice”

  1. kjg

    ImageOptim will losslessly convert JPEGs to progressive when this makes files smaller.

  2. Sérgio Lopes

    Nice article. Browser support is still a problem but it’s getting better. I tested on a few more browsers:

    - Opera 12.12 on Mac renders foreground images progressively but not background ones.

    Most browsers still suck:

    - IE10 on Windows 8 still doesn’t support progressive background progressive images.

    - Firefox 19 (Aurora) on Mac still doesn’t render background jpgs progressively.

    - Webkit nightly (Dec 28) doesn’t support progressive jpgs at all (img and background).

    And to complement the mobile tests, I tested on Android (my Galaxy SII running 4.0). Results:

    - Chrome Mobile 18 renders both foreground and background jpgs progressively.
    - Firefox Mobile 17 renders only foreground images progressively (like Firefox Desktop).
    - Android stock browser and Dolphin fails both tests.

  3. Matt Mehlhope

    Nice to see the depth behind the article in terms of actual CPU used to render the images. I’ve been using progressive JPGs for some time now, if nothing else because of the perceived load times, and perhaps it decreases the latency until necessary page reflows (something to test?).

    Until recently, like, KJG I used ImageOptim, and now that I have CodeKit as a part of my workflow I use it. Regardless, this is a great part of the build process!

    Now if only we had a sufficient solution for responsive images…

  4. Matt Orley

    Another one of photoshop’s mystery settings solved with great gusto. I appreciate your article, and you’ve just made MY corner of the web faster:)

  5. Stefan Hayden

    When we added a full page slideshow to our homepage over at Bigstock we paid special care to getting the first image to load asap and a big part of that was progressive loading of the jpg.

    A handy trick in knowing if a jpg you have is progressive or not is to open it up in a text editor and look for 2 more hex codes of: FFDA

  6. Donna

    At these size files, we are talking the difference of milliseconds, right?

  7. Patrick Meenan

    Wow, I got the sense that usage of progressive jpegs was light based on anecdotal browsing but only 7.4% is downright shocking. Since you can do a lossless transform directly from a baseline to progressive without re-compressing the image it would be great if we could see CDN’s and other parts of the serving pipeline do it automatically.

    For mobile, a lot of the native browsers offload image decode to dedicated ASICs on the chip for power and performance reasons. It would be interesting to see if those support streaming progressive decoding or if they just return the fully decoded image (would explain the behavior).

    Thanks for pulling the data, this is some great low-hanging fruit.

  8. Darío Cravero

    Here’s a quick converter for those of you who may need it (using ImageMagick’s convert):

    find path/to/jpegs -type f -name '*.jpg' -exec convert -interlace line -quality 80 {} {} \;

  9. Ilya Grigorik

    Ann, one small correction: SPDY does *not* apply any content-specific transformations, it’s a transport / framing protocol. Delivering JPEGs over SPDY will not magically convert them to “progressive”.

  10. webegg

    Great article and one of those small but significant changes that everyone can make to improve user experience.
    I put together a demo to test this: http://demos.webegg.co.uk/progressive-jpg
    Even throttling my localhost to 28.8 kbps had little effect on the initial load of the low quality ‘layer’. Chop chop booming has always been one of those details I’ve wanted to get rid of in my builds, the sooner the final ‘structure’ of the page reveals itself the better IMHO.
    I for one will be checking the box from now on.

  11. Warren Moore

    Minor nitpick: you say that “pixel depth is increasing,” but now that support for 24-bit images (32-bit if you include an alpha channel) is practically universal, it’s not going to go further in the foreseeable future. You won’t see “deep color” becoming popular, especially on the Web, for many years yet, because it’s largely superfluous.

  12. Rallias

    In the optipng section, there’s a typo. It should be optipng, not opting.

  13. Jon Humphrey

    Funny thing is way back when everybody jumped on board the progressive train due to the load speeds over dial up connections the mantra was “It’s always better to see something than nothing!” Then along came broadband and progressive seemed to take a back burner unless you were building specifically for handheld devices? Throw in the lack of browser support and it wouldn’t surprise me if this still doesn’t change again for a while even though I will be checking the box too from here on out!
    Thanks for the lightbulb!

  14. Sérgio Lopes

    Darío, you can simply use ‘mogrify’ (from ImageMagick) instead of find+convert. Something like:

    mogrify -interlace plane *.jpg

  15. Frédéric kayser

    I’m a bit disappointed by the lack of technical background of this article.
    There are a few good books about JPEG like “Compressed Image File Formats” by John Miano.
    First of all you cannot oppose “baseline” to “progressive”, baseline is just a restrictive subset of “sequential” JPEG. “baseline” and “extended sequential” (SOF0 and SOF1) form the sequential part of JPEG.

    There are actually 4 types of JPEG : sequential, progressive, hierarchical and lossless.
    - Lossless has never been really good and has been quickly replaced by JPEG-LS.

    - Developers never bothered to implement hierarchical JPEG until recently, Thomas Richter is trying to bring new features like HDR and a new lossless format to the old JPEG : https://github.com/thorfdbg/libjpeg
    Hierarchical was meant to transfer delta images between a low definition image and a high definition one (so called Retina pictures).

    - There is not just one way to save a progressive JPEG but a few hundreds, tools like JPEGrescan – included in ImageOptim and ScriptJPG – try to find an optimal scan setting.

    - Sequential JPEGs can actually look a bit like progressive ones, since the different components (Y’CbCr) can be send independently and not only together in an MCU block. For instance one could send chroma (Y’) first, this would yield in a black and white picture, and luma (CbCr) afterwards, it would still be a sequential JPEG.

    Regarding the difference between “baseline” and “extended sequential”, extended sequential allows more Huffman tables to be defined simultaneously this could be used to set different “quality” settings for Cb and Cr. 12-bits per component and arithmetic coding could also be used in extended mode. Arithmetic coding replaces Huffman encoding and usually produces 5 to 10% smaller files, but due to patent fear it was not implement for a long time (even nowadays browsers are unable to decode it).

    It’s not a well-known fact but browsers are only able to decode about one quarter of the original JPEG specifications (no arithmetic coding, no 12-bits per component, no hierarchical and no lossless).

    Regarding the progressive encoding benefit, of course it works that’s why JPEGrescan has been written. But I would double check your figures, some badly performed sequential to progressive transformations could throw away EXIF metadatas including an ICC profile and that alone could save a few kilobytes. And some over-conservative “baseline” JPEGs use the default Huffman tables and not optimized ones, this could also save a few kilobytes.

  16. Derek

    A bit of a nitpick, but

    When images arrive, they come tripping onto the page, pushing other elements around and triggering a clumsy repaint.

    can be avoided by including element dimensions where possible in your stylesheet for your images.

  17. Damir B.

    @Dona: It’s not about those couple of KB saved (or gained in some cases), but the website rendering (at least in browsers whose coders care about this issue) and feedback users get when they know an image is about to load in a specific area.

  18. Anon

    Progressive images sucks. It takes time to realize that it has stopped loading and you just want to ignore looking at the image until it is completely loaded because it looks like CRAP before

    With a baseline image you can start examining it right when it starts loading, you dont get the full image but the parts you get contains the original pixels. Also you know exactly when it completes because it has stopped growing vertically

    Please stop using this SHIT called progressive images

  19. Robin

    This sounds to me like someone (the author) re-discovered/re-invented something old. When I started with web development back in 1999 using progressive JPEGs was the standard, for the obvious eason that pretty much all internet connections of that time were very slow. Back then everyone understood and related to the concept of “perceived speed”. There’s no “new” in this practice, and I wonder how “best” it is today anyway, when a slow connection of 1-2 mbit/s is enough to satisfy even the impatent when it comes to normal-sized images for the web.

  20. Eli

    That’s odd – I wonder if Safari has been changed recently? It’s always rendered progressive jpegs progressively for me.

    I just tested it with version 4.1.3 and sure enough, it did the right thing.

  21. vivi

    I don’t agree with the premise that progressive JPEGs are better. Sequential JPEGs give a clear visual indicator of when the image has loaded, for a progressive JPEG you can’t be sure unless you examine the image very closely.

    When a page is loading the first image the user sees with progressive is blurry and low quality, consequently the opinion formed in the first few seconds is bad. The user may have already closed the page by the time it takes to load everything completely. Using sequential JPEGs makes it very clear that more data will come, and people are used to this kind of visual feedback.

  22. Martijn

    I see two main obstacles still:

    1) CMSes. Any selfrespecting CMS will re-render images at specified sizes, so the author doesn’t have to do that by himself. That’s great and all, but this kind of functionality rarely ever gives the author (or the developer for that matter) control over how the resulting jpegd are compressed – no progressive or baseline setting, no quality setting, usually nothing. So what is actually outputted is your and my best guess.

    2) Web authors. Either they are incompetent and don’t know or care about all this. They need education (and sometimes a whip!) But even even they want to do it right, they usually can’t because of (1)…

    For now, only we who know progressive jpeg is a good idea, and we who have 100% control of the jpegs that are actually emitted to the browser, we who care about web performance. We can apply this. Otherwise, either one or both of these obstacles will occur as far as I can forsee.

  23. Andy

    From my experience progressive JPGs in combination with Flash elements (like for slide shows) are a source of trouble. Sometimes they would work, sometimes they won’t.

  24. ChrisH

    @Martijn

    With any luck, the authors of CMSes will be reading this, or will know it already. Perhaps from reading Stoyan Stefanov’s blog post on this subject four years ago:
    http://www.yuiblog.com/blog/2008/12/05/imageopt-4/

    All the languages you are likely to see CMSes written in have libraries which support writing progressive/interlaced jpegs, so if your CMS doesn’t offer this option, file a feature request.

    For example, enabling interlacing in PHP is as simple as calling imageinterlace($image, TRUE) before writing the image file.

    When I write code which resizes images or generates thumbnails, the quality, format (sometimes, anyway!) and whether jpegs are interlaced is configurable in a config file. Thumbs are created on demand, so simply tweaking the settings and clearing the cached thumbs regenerates new ones at the new settings the next time they are requested.

    This is essential (IMO) to deal with the perennial “the thumbnails are poor quality” vs “the thumbnails take too long to load” playoff (remarks often coming from the same person) without requiring them to upload all their images again.

    Cheers!

  25. Micah S

    The claim is that progressive JPGs are better for usability, but the user (not designer/coder) feedback in these comments, which I agree with, is that progressive JPGs are inferior. The reasons given by Anon and vivi are clear enough, so I won’t repeat them. Please don’t use progressive JPGs.

  26. EricLaw

    This page (http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/Forums/Thread/2563/) implies that Flash isn’t able to natively render progressive JPEGs. Any Flash folks out there know whether this is true?

  27. Dew Drop – December 30, 2012 (#1,472) | Alvin Ashcraft's Morning Dew

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  28. Niki

    In countries with CRAPPY sub-3G data speeds, like where I live in. I think progressive vs baseline JPEGs really don’t make any difference at all.

    In baseline JPEG, you’ll get the top part first. If it takes too long to load, you’ll just scroll past it because an image that only has its top part visible is useless especially if the point of interest is in the middle or the bottom of the image .

    In progressive JPEG, you’ll get an image with bad quality first that eventually gets better. Yes maybe you’ll get an idea of what the image is, but if it takes too long to load, it will be stuck to this bad quality image and you’re just as likely to scroll past this image as well.

  29. Pat

    Reading up on JPEGReScan mentioned above in a comment, apparently the reason it saves space is that it divides the image up into “image” and “noise” scans, with the image scan being sent first. Not only does compressing the noise seperately make for a lossless compression gain but I believe (as it’s not explicitly claimed as a benefit) that it means that a visually acceptable image should arrive faster as imperceptable detail is held back to the last scan.

    It would be interesting to extend the visual example of the piglet picture, to see how far the non-progressive JPEG got before the second pass of a Rescanned JPEG.

    Even better would be to explore the different options via an interactive exampe like this one:

    http://pooyak.com/p/progjpeg/

    Which graphically backs up the author’s suggestion that progressive looks and works better on slow connections.

    (Also, is it possible that the progressive piglet demo has been made to look worse than reality by being recompressed as a (slightly resized?) jpeg?)

  30. Ann

    @Sergío

    Thank you so much for doing more research on browser support of progressive jpegs. The chart I made needs this detail.

    I’m happy to hear there are are few more browsers properly rendering progressive jpegs than I thought. From your comment: Opera 12.12 Mac (foreground), Chrome 18 on Android (both foreground and background), and Firefox 17 on Android (foreground).

    I’m afraid Chrome on iOS does not support progressive rendering of pjpegs. I’ll need to update the chart with your findings and the various iOS browsers.

  31. jackyon

    wow, this is pretty cool tips, thank u for your great post, I will use it in my projects.

    the only thing pity is not all browsers are support progressive jpeg, that’s so sad…

  32. Joachim

    Clients could also decide to load & use only the first 40% of progressive JPEGs, so having a nice way of LoD … see here: http://blog.yoav.ws/2012/05/Responsive-image-format

  33. Rachel Nabors

    I used to use progressive jpegs about six years ago, and in some browsers, they always looked blurry. So I turned the option off. I imagine that’s changed! I should give these another try. Thank you for this delightfully entertaining post!

  34. Ann

    Here’s a video of the test used to make the example screenshot, which is really the best way to argue for the perceived speed benefits of progressive JPEGs:

    http://youtu.be/TOc15-2apY0

    And here is the test comparing the two large images, but as backgrounds, in the same browser (Firefox, Windows) which does not progressively render backgrounds.

    http://youtu.be/5wjIwrUUuFg

    I’m observing here that Firefox will only load one background image at a time — if the progressive jpeg were first in the HTML, it would display first. More tests need to be done, but in this case neither type of jpeg has any progressive benefit — no “chop chop chop” for baseline. Progressive jpegs here are not worse, as I think said in the post, they are the same.

    You may notice that the version of Firefox used in this example is way out of date (12) but I wanted to keep it consistent with the screenshot.

    And btw, I like how we are now talking about piglets as if “piglet” were a unit for measuring perceived speed :)

  35. Scott Simpson

    It would be interesting to add Fireworks vs Photoshop to the mix. Which creates the best progressive .JPGs?

  36. Progressive JPGs: A New Best Practice | NikosX Blog

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  37. Attiks

    For Drupal people reading this, the Image optimize effect module allows you to easily enable this.

  38. Ricardo Zea

    Interesting.

    Not sure why one wouldn’t use Progressive JPGs, this type of JPG has been around forever, this is not new and browser support has always been there.

    “92.6%” » This is the amount of Web Designers and Developers that have no effin clue about images.

  39. Progressive JPGs: A New Best Practice | Lunarium Design

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  40. Chad von Nau

    Calling progressive jpegs a best practice is a bit… subjective. I think they are a great option in some circumstances, but they are not always desirable.

    They start out ugly and this first impression can be worse than an image taking a long time to load. The CPU usage from repaints can be significant and detrimental to the overall responsiveness of a site. And it’s not always clear when progressive images have finished loading.

    Even if you don’t find progressive jpg loading to be ugly, you must at least concede it is a different style. Progressive is kind of the CSI (enhance, enhance, enhance…) to sequential’s inkjet printer technique. I find progressive jpegs give a site a techy, energetic mood, while sequential jpegs are more subdued and impart less personality.

    I see the difference as being similar to the way different browsers load webfonts. Firefox loads the page with a system font, then replaces it with the webfont once it has downloaded locally. All the other browsers wait until the webfont has downloaded before displaying any text. Neither approach is intrinsically better, but they each have circumstances where they are desirable. At least with progressive and sequential jpegs, we have the control. It’d be nice if we had the same level of control over webfont loading.

    Progressive jpegs are a good addition to one’s toolbelt, not a cure-all. The research here is helpful for making informed decisions about when to use them, but the overall recommendation seems to come more from a purely technical perspective rather than one than also considers aesthetics and feel. Compress wisely, my friends.

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  42. Carlos Leopoldo

    but it’s disappointing that browsers are not supporting this yet, but the trend is to support progressive jpeg

  43. Ryan McKay

    I definitely think browser support for this needs to be cleaned up, it’s a JPEG feature that’s been around for yonks!
    One detail in this though that I want to point out; a website that is well-designed won’t move around when it’s images have finished loading ;)

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  46. Tim Acheson

    I had assumed that this was already the consensus in web production — progressive JPEGs are widely considered best practice. There are obvious benefits to making web content JPEGs progressive, while there is rarely a compelling reason not to make them progressive. IMHO a good web Content Management System and/or image management tool should save JPEGs as progressive by default.

  47. Jack Nycz

    ImageOptim – progressive awesomeness.

  48. Dan

    Great article and interesting point of view. I think baseline jpegs are better because of mobile devices that you’ve mentioned in your article. For me, as the Email Marketer it isn’t great as most of emails are read on mobile devices.

    I would start doing progressive jpegs as soon as processors in mobiles are much stronger.

    Once again: great article, clever thinking!

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  50. Pete Markeiwicz

    The fact that Progressive JPEGs have a significant “user experience” component demonstrates why WPO thinking isn’t enough. In non-web disciplines like architecture, efficiency and user experience (as well as inclusive design) are combined under various “sustainability” frameworks. Thinking of the overall “carbon footprint” of a web transaction, as is done in sustainable design in other professions, may be better than considering things separately.

    So, a web version of sustainability could regularize “best practice” for Web Performance, User Experience, and Inclusive Design under one roof. I’m put up a basic list for sustainable web design at:

    http://sustainablevirtualdesign.wordpress.com/sust-design/

    more specific idea in any areas are welcome.

  51. Article Roundup for 01.4.13 - Tvenge Design

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  52. Prestashop

    I have not tested, but does kraken.io convert progressive jpg’s to baseline?

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  55. Chris Khoo

    It’s a very subjective topic – but perhaps Philip Greenspun puts it nicely:

    Some people like interlaced or “progressive” images, which load gradually. The theory behind these formats is that the user can at least look at a fuzzy full-size proxy for the image while all the bits are loading. In practice, the user is forced to look at a fuzzy full-size proxy for the image while all the bits are loading. Is it done? Well, it looks kind of fuzzy. Oh wait, the top of the image seems to be getting a little more detail. Maybe it is done now. It is still kind of fuzzy, though. Maybe the photographer wasn’t using a tripod. Oh wait, it seems to be clearing up now …

    A standard GIF or JPEG is generally swept into its frame as the bits load. The user can ignore the whole image until it has loaded in its final form, then take a good close look. He never has to wonder whether more bits are yet to come.

    Source: http://philip.greenspun.com/panda/images

    IMHO, use standard images for actual content (like photos in an article) and use progressive images for non-content images (like shadows, rounded corners, etc. that make up a webpage’s effects)

  56. Marco Berrocal

    I have always saved them as Progressive because I think I read it somewhere I don’t remember now.

    But, I also think the problem stems from the fact that many people prefer to use SAVE AS in PS as opposed to Save for Web & Devices.

  57. Mathew Porter

    Like Marco i have also saved for web and then optimise images in FireWorks after PS to try and get the best possible size to quality ratio.

    Its a shame that all browsers dont keep up with the emerging tech as quickly as we would like as developers.

  58. Lee Kowalkowski

    OK, so the comments contain a little flak for how progressive JPEGs behave on browsers. That is a problem with the browser rather than the image format. The browser should have an option to let you switch between ‘render progressively’ or ‘wait for image’, so guys that hate how progressive images are gradually displayed can quit whining. For authors, perhaps this should be a new CSS property, users could still override it.

    What normal user cares whether the image has finished loading or not? Who’s waiting on these images thinking is that finished yet? I’m amazed by such strong feelings.

    If the browser and server support persistent HTTP connections and chunked transfer encoding (i.e. HTTP 1.1), I imagine it wouldn’t be too hard for the browser to request the JPEG file in efficient chunks and only request more of the file if it is required, that is, responsive images without any additional markup whatsoever.

  59. Revision 102: Templates, JPEGs, JavaScript und OpenSource | Working Draft

    [...] [00:17:06] Progressive jpegs: a new best practice [...]

  60. endiendo

    About the speed : I think there is many more “priority” to improve on a website than the photos.The photo is often “a main content” of the page, so people want to see it, and so, accept to wait a little for it. But all of your css, js, and jquerys.. , they don’t see it, so they will not wait for a slow page because of that…

    About the jpeg : many softwares still don’t know the progressive jpg. At work we use Digimarc to mark our photos. So then I don’t “touch” them to keep the digimarc strong. I will not re-open them in photoshop just to “save as progressive”.. and to make the digimarc weaker..

    If browsers and softwares has one field and format to include, it’s Jpg2000. This was very good, but nobody wanted to accept it.. JPG 2000 would have been a real improvement for the web, over normal jpg..

  61. DevCast Weekly #1 | DevCast

    [...] 1:03:01 Imagens progressivas. [...]

  62. Eugene OZ

    I want to share it in G+, Facebook, Twitter. Where is sharing buttons?

  63. Web designer Kent

    masterclass in jpegumy, if only my clients could understand this stuff. Images are a nightmare for us web designers but as a foot note – how many times have you tried the gif option? some images at web res hardly change (any browser). Not for the light hearted tho.

    And another thought, do 3G networks still crush the jpeg quality? I read an article 4 years ago when 3G got going here in the UK

  64. Andreas

    I would argue that the best practice for JPEG images is to use tools like http://www.jpegmini.com to keep the quality and lower the file size.

    Also, it’s not really true that mobile users won’t notice a low res image. With my iPhone 4 I notice the crappy quality of all high res images because of the retina-issue.

  65. Yogesh A

    That is indeed a very knowledgeable article about images on web, liked a lot..thank you..

  66. skal

    Hi,

    note that progressive JPEG uses more CPU (for the per-scan extra idct and YUV->RGB color conversion) but also quite more memory:

    * you have to keep the final picture in memory (24bits per pixel)
    * you also have to keep all Fourier coefficients for the pixel, as they are refined progressively. This means roughly an extra 24bits per pixels in YUV422 format.

    So, you basically need 3x the memory of baseline.

    Pascal

  67. skal

    Hi again,

    actually, i just remembered that one can sometimes use some direct-to-buffer rendering tricks for progressive too. So, the requirement of storing an unfinished copy of the final RGB pixels can be mitigated. Memory consumption is probably between 2x and 3x then.

    Pascal

  68. Weekly Design News (N.165)

    [...] Progressive jpegs: A New Best Practice [...]

  69. Image optimization: Lossy, lossless and other techniques

    [...] to Progressive jpegs: a new best practice I have learnt that progressive JPGs normally weight less than baseline ones. Not only that, but [...]

  70. Go for progressive JPEG | CSS Blog

    [...] only disadvantage of using progressive jpegs is browser support. Only some of the modern browsers support progressive jpegs. Fortunately browsers which do not render progressive jpegs, display them when entire image is [...]

  71. Design Focus: Excellent E-commerce Photography - heromind - High quality design resources for graphics and web designer in 2013

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  72. Revue de Presse Xebia | Blog Xebia France

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  74. HTML and displaying of <img/> element | BlogoSfera

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  75. 给网页设计师和前端开发者看的前端性能优化

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  76. 前端性能優化 | 飛洛奇工作室

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  77. The State Of Responsive Web Design | Tuts – Infos++

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  78. The State Of Responsive Web DesignFeeds | Feeds

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  79. The State Of Responsive Web Design | Webinest

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  80. The State Of Responsive Web Design | Dumper

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  81. The State Of Responsive Web Design - rehavaPress

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  82. The State Of Responsive Web Design

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  83. The State Of Responsive Web Design | DigitalMofo

    [...] as it renders. Non-progressive JPEG images are rendered from top to bottom. In her article “Progressive JPEGs: A New Best Practice,” Ann Robson argues that progressive JPEGs give the impression of greater speed than baseline [...]

  84. The State Of Responsive Web Design - socialmedia360

    [...] as it renders. Non-progressive JPEG images are rendered from top to bottom. In her article “Progressive JPEGs: A New Best Practice,” Ann Robson argues that progressive JPEGs give the impression of greater speed than baseline [...]

  85. The State Of Responsive Web Design | DCGraphics

    [...] as it renders. Non-progressive JPEG images are rendered from top to bottom. In her article “Progressive JPEGs: A New Best Practice,” Ann Robson argues that progressive JPEGs give the impression of greater speed than baseline [...]

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  87. The State Of Responsive Web Design | DK Studio

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  88. The State Of Responsive Web Design - Pittsburgh Web Design & Hosting

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  89. How to Responsive Web Design | Blog - Bee IT Limited

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  90. The State Of Responsive Web Design | Affordable Website Design - Wordpress Website Development

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  91. Blog – Max. Deconinck» Blog Archive Responsive Webdesign – présent et futur de l’adaptation mobile » Blog - Max. Deconinck

    [...] JPEG non progressifs s’affichent de haut en bas. Ann Robson met en avant dans son article Progressive JPEGs: A New Best Practice le fait que cette compression d’image donne à l’utilisateur une plus grande [...]

  92. Responsive Webdesign – présent et futur de l’adaptation mobile : Studio-ProWeb

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  93. The State Of Responsive Web Design | Datajo

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  94. New Proposed Tests for YSlow | Practical Web Development from Ann Robson

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  95. Mark

    Really useful article as I am looking at ways to improve page load score tests.

  96. How to check if a JPEG is progressive | HiddenTao

    [...] That way they will appear to load quicker for visitors to my website. This practise seems to be gaining steam recently. In fact, remember in the late 90′s when computers and internet speeds were slower? [...]

  97. Peter

    Eine schöne Zusammenstellung, muss ich echt zugeben.
    Es ist eine schöne Sache mit progressiven jpegs.
    Danke für die Tipps. Viele Grüße.
    Peter

  98. The State Of Responsive Web Design | TheSmartTech

    [...] as it renders. Non-progressive JPEG images are rendered from top to bottom. In her article “Progressive JPEGs: A New Best Practice,” Ann Robson argues that progressive JPEGs give the impression of greater speed than baseline [...]

  99. Progressive JPEG performance optimization

    [...] side by side comparison of how to efficiently compress lossless progressive JPEGs in the light of progressive JPEGs being a better pick for UX & their advantages on mobile connections, the fact that WebPagetest now urges you to deliver progressive JPEGs because only ~7% of all JPEGs [...]

  100. Image optimization using cronjobs | Byte Blog

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  102. O Cenário das Imagens no Web Design Responsivo | Eduardo Joaquim Silva

    [...] nitidez. Já as imagens JPEG não-progressivas são renderizadas de cima pra baixo. Em seu artigo “JPEG’s progressivos: Uma nova boa prática”, Ann Robson afirma que o JPEG progressivo aparenta ser mais veloz que o JPEG baseline. Um JPEG [...]

  103. Eliza Alton

    amazing amazing wow

  104. Zdenek

    I have implemented a variation of Google’s approach on my website. I’m getting better results with baseline JPEGs and there’s no way I would do any conversion when it’s lossy. The progressive files instantly cover the whole area with big pixels blocking the view of the carefully crafted stretched thumbnails.

  105. Pete

    I am slightly (but only slightly) in favour of the optimized approach.

    Different websites cater for different crowds. My website is an arts, fashion, entertainment orientated one, so, the quality of the images, and how they appear is important. I can only sway reasonable, borderline image ‘decay’ for the sake of faster load times.

    My approach could be slightly different if I were, say, setting up a financial services website.

    Secondly, we also need to realize that the average page size, over the past decade or so, has increased exponentially (from some 300kb to about 1+mb) on some of the most visited sites on the internet. A large part of this is images, but javascript and others have taken their toll.

    Again, Internet connections are becoming far more powerful and faster. Even people in the African Hinterland are now getting internet, which is now verging on absolute broadband (for those who can afford it, of course. It is becoming competitive, so, cheap, fast broadband is only 1-5 years away in some of these rural areas).

    Therefore, I think that the future will not be too kind towards the idea of web users seeing blurred, pixelated images as the first thing. It can be slightly dis-orientating. On the other hand, yes, the quicker the images ‘download’, the better. But, web users are becoming ever more demanding. They will always want more power and aesthetically pleasing experiences.

    I think that, when techies and developers discus issues such as optimized or progressive, it is best to take a step back, and understand that both the optimized and progressive options are there for good reason (relatively speaking). If they weren’t, then a slew of other image formats would have long since supplanted jpegs and co. ages ago.

    So, my advice is, use according to requirements, market, and events on the ground. Technology is changing and getting better, faster, at a quick rate.

  106. O Cenário do Web Design Responsivo - Tableless

    [...] nitidez. Já as imagens JPEG não-progressivas são renderizadas de cima pra baixo. Em seu artigo “JPEG’s progressivos: Uma nova boa prática”, Ann Robson afirma que o JPEG progressivo aparenta ser mais veloz que o JPEG baseline. Um JPEG [...]

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  109. agneygor@tahoo.com

    But browsing a website utilising baseline-rendered jpgs on mobile can be furthermore very annoying! permits say the sheet isnt completely laden, but were inquisitive and scroll to the middle of the sheet, maybe dig into some content (like reading a paragraph), and then abruptly, the baseline jpgs infront of it, get entirely laden and the content we were into jumps (way) down the sheet and we have to search for it one time again to read the rest of it. maybe it isnt a best practice, but progressive jpgs can give a certain benefit. Appreciate the thoughts anyway!

  110. techzon

    According to the table in the item, the browsers without progressive jpeg capability renderer the likeness after it is completely downloaded, which by her own delineations is slower. in person, I would rate the factual handicap of this to a scale tied to the users attachment hasten. In a broadband environment, it may be a moot issue.

    The cause I ceased using progressive jpegs years ago was purchaser repsonse. They despised them. If there were a bottleneck in the connection any place, they would freeze in a blocky state. allocated, this was a ten years before and better infrastructure, more powerful graphics chips and much better browsers may have marginalized this topic as well.

    I’m not opposed to utilising them, I just take topic with her affirmation of this as a best perform. Speaking of which, I’m inquisitive as to why you avoid dimensions. I don’t generally apply dimensions to images exactly, but they are habitually inside some dimension-specified component. Is that what you mean, or do you just bypass setting any dimensions?

  111. The State Of Responsive Web Design | DesignerGuruji

    […] as it renders. Non-progressive JPEG images are rendered from top to bottom. In her article “Progressive JPEGs: A New Best Practice,” Ann Robson argues that progressive JPEGs give the impression of greater speed than baseline […]

  112. pd

    Has anybody every tested whether some people might feel a bit skin-crawly whilst looking at progressive images loading? Tough research topic I guess but I wonder how many people either feel icky looking at a progressive image loading, or alternatively feels for a few seconds that something in broken with the site whilst the image looks, well, broken.

  113. BB

    Nice way to optimize jpegs, today’s web speed is a key factor in SEO, so I salute this kind of improvements.

    I really want a wp-plugin for automize the process.

    Erwin.

  114. Chris Thompson

    I am using ImageMagick to create progressive JPGs and have an option between using scanline or plane interlacing. Is there any recommendation as to which of those is better?

  115. Improve Website Load Times Using Progressive JPEGS

    […] JPEG files on the Internet are in baseline format — over 92%, according to a research by Ann Robson of WebShots. But most of these JPEGs are baseline because popular image-editing tools are set to […]

  116. 响应式网页设计进行时(一) – ResponsiveCn

    […] 还有一个越来越流行的想法是 progressive JPEG。 顾名思义,progressive JPEG图片渐进式渲染。初期的渲染很模糊,然后图片逐渐清晰。我们一般的jpeg图片是从上到下渲染的。在文章“Progressive JPEGs: A New Best Practice”。Ann认为Progressive JPEG相对于一般的JPEG图片,速度给人的印象深刻。一张progressive JPEG图片给用户更快的图片印象。这没有解决性能和图片的技术问题,但的确提升了用户体验。 […]

  117. Styleto | Machine à souvenirs

    […] as it renders. Non-progressive JPEG images are rendered from top to bottom. In her article “Progressive JPEGs: A New Best Practice,” Ann Robson argues that progressive JPEGs give the impression of greater speed than baseline […]

  118. Progressive JPEG pro e contro | > cat /var/log/daily | Development and Analysis of games

    […] Nell’articolo Progressive jpegs: a new best practice, Ann Robson (@aronbson), analizza tutti i pro e i contro dell’utilizzare progressive JPEG invece che baseline. […]

  119. CopyQuery | Question & Answer Tool for your Technical Queries

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  120. adria

    Unless the image is really massive, or the only item on the page, such as an image gallery, I doubt I’d even notice progress vs baseline. With a decent internet connection, 100k jpgs loads “instantly”.

  121. My Repair Centre

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  122. Progressive JPGs for WordPress | Go Make Things

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  124. プログレッシブJPEGによる描画高速化 | E-COMMERCE BUSINESS BLOG

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  153. The State Of Responsive Web Design | Smashing Magazine

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