Both of these waterfall graphs come from the same landing page for the same ecommerce site. One is optimized, and one is not. Which waterfall led to greater revenues?

Waterfall A Waterfall B

Vote for which waterfall you think is faster, and then get a detailed breakdown of how each one performed.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Joshua Bixby photo

Joshua Bixby (@JoshuaBixby) - by day, president of Strangeloop, a company that designs and implements site acceleration solutions. By night, he mines data about web performance and its impact on users.

10 Responses to “Poll: Which waterfall led to greater revenues?”

  1. Praveen

    Thanks for sharing this Joshua.

    There is one more thing which I would like to highlight here, it’s the emphasis people put on the Home page.
    It’s not the home page that needs to be tweaked(always), the page where the user spends the most amount of time is what needs to be optimized first & given more attention.

    Take an example of a news site.
    The first thing that comes to a our mind is http://www.xyznewsSite.com has to have a YSlow grade A & load in 2 sec, but we often neglect that the most viewed pages are the article pages & not the home page.

    My approach to ix performance issues start by looking at the stats that tell me which page is the most viewed/visited.

    -Praveen

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  6. Michael easpices

    Hi Josh,

    Thanks for this article, I am also working on some Ecommerce projects and really hanving a headache optimizing performance for the pages. I’ve used several tools similar to YSlow and Page Speed but they were not useful at all.

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